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Category: project launch

The Department of Ecology, Art, & Technology

Recent Works
http://www.ecoarttech.net/quicktimes

Press Image for Blogs
http://www.ecoarttech.net/images/wildernesstrouble_web.jpg

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Wilderness Trouble V1.0, 2007 (9.2MB)
http://www.restlessculture.net/mov/wildernesstroublev1_web.mov

A Quicktime video and DVD, inspired by William Cronon’s article entitled “The Trouble with Wilderness; or, Getting Back to the Wrong Nature.” This article, which was critical to ecocriticism’s recent shift from deep to social ecological models, argues that the concept of “wilderness” has no basis in nature but is a historical and cultural construction. Cronon points out that the U.S. preoccupation with conserving “natural” spaces untouched by humans was a guise of American colonialism (throwing indigenous people off their land to make national parks), and his concern is that it fails today to imagine new, healthy, and sustainable relationships between humans and their environments. This meditational DV attempts to add a consideration of the digital to this reevaluation of wilderness—by refusing to separate modern human life from relatively “natural” environments and by thinking about nature and the digital technologies that make this work possible in the same frame.

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Wilderness Information Network, Summer 2006 (31.8MB)
http://www.restlessculture.net/mov/wildinfonetdoc2_web.mov

Quicktime documentary of an installation at the intersection of artist-curation and collaboration. Initiated by Cary Peppermint, this project included sound-art works from over thirty international artists. WildInfoNet encouraged artists to create sound works in the “voice” of ecological other, or to make works in which the artists’ considered themselves as human animal; beings within “nature” producing sound for unknowable others. The project was located 173 miles northwest of NYC, in the Catskill mountains of New York state. Hikers to the back-woods installation used wireless technologies and transistor radios to receive the information-art via .mp3 downloads and radio transmissions. This documentary is featured on DVD in the upcoming Sound:Space Sound Art Symposium, a day of artist talks, demonstrations, and performances exploring contemporary artistic use of sound and environment at the South Hill Park Digital Media Centre in Bracknell, United Kingdom (http://www.sound-space.info).

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A Series of Practical Performances In The Wilderness (3.4 – 11.2MB)
http://www.restlessculture.net/mov/practical_quicktimes.html

Quicktime performance database made in the woods and on rural backlots. Practical Performances is part of Cary Peppermint and Christine Nadir’s series of performance art videos begun in 2002.
These videos document the performances that took place one summer when we spent too long in the woods and away from “civilization.” Previously, however, we understood this video-performance work in the following way… http://www.ecoarttech.net/practicalperformance/index.htm

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ECOARTTECH.NET
Artistically & creatively imagining
non-primitive, ecologically sustainable futures.

42 or 363 Definitions of Cartography

42 or 363 Definitions of Cartography is a text by kanarinka which attempts 42 or 363 definitions of the term "cartography"None of the definitions are original (i.e. all definitions are stolen). The definitions come from interesting places like cartography journals, Lewis Carroll, other artists, video game sites, cultural theory, Spanish dictionaries, and military training manuals.
Where

Buy print copy at Lulu.com for $11.98

Download free book at Free Press Free Press by Sal Randolph

42 or 363 Definitions of Cartography was published via Free Press, an open-access publishing house launched at Röda Sten contemporary art center in Göteborg, Sweden in Fall 2006. A project of artist Sal Randolph, Free Press accepted all kinds of writing from the public; contributions in any language could be as short as a single word or as long as an encyclopedia and could include manifestos, statements, documentations, studies, stories, recipes, poems and whatever you could imagine.

“Even in the age of the internet, book publishing is a walled garden where editors and commercial interests filter out most of what is
written," says Randolph. "To publish is to ‘make public,’ and the published materials of the world create their own kind of public space, a city of books where readers and writers are citizens. Free Press aims to open up access to that public space. Like any city, Free Press is bound to include both ugliness and beauty, though the definitions of each will certainly differ.”

All participating manuscripts were published as printed books in the Free Press series, available in the project’s library and reading room at Röda Sten, where events and discussions also took place. Additional copies have been placed on shelves in local bookstores and libraries. Readers can download copies from the website and order them at cost from an internet book printer.

The Free Press exhibition took place from September 16 – October 15, 2006 at Röda Sten.

More info: Free Press Website

The Institute for Infinitely Small Things is a research organization whose mission is to invent and distribute new practices of political engagement in everyday life. Current research interests include: performing corporate language in public space, creating definitions of cartography, destabilizing consumer architectures, hacking maps and lying to people about art.

iKatun’s mission is to present and support contemporary art that fosters public engagement in the politics of everyday information. To realize this mission, iKatun supports art projects, organizes exhibitions and conferences, publishes critical writing, runs workshops, gives lectures and fosters community locally and internationally. iKatun is a 501(c)3 organization based in Boston, MA.

Turbulence Commission: “Cell Tagging” by Brooke A. Knight

http://turbulence.org/Works/cell_tagging

The mobile phone occupies a space that is both connecting and distancing. Seemingly ubiquitous, it has become an increasingly powerful tool, functioning as a phone, PDA, browser, and camera. With “Cell Tagging” it becomes a remote control that allows users to dial, draw, and speak. After dialing the number posted on the website, users are asked to enter a zip/city code that is significant to them. An aerial map of that place loads onto the screen. After choosing a color and brush size from the palette, users can use their cell phone keypads to draw directly onto the map. They are asked to speak into the phone and say why that place and drawing is meaningful to them. Users can save their drawings to the “Cell Tagging” database where others may view them. Cell phone users “graffiti” the sound-space around them, making every place their own. “Cell Tagging” literalizes this act of marking.

“Cell Tagging” is a 2006 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc., (aka Ether-Ore) for its Turbulence web site. It was made possible with funding from the LEF Foundation.

BIOGRAPHY

Brooke A. Knight is an artist and educator who has been working with digital media for over a dozen years. He has exhibited in over 40 international and regional venues, including Art Interactive, Photographic Resource Center, Mediaterra 2001, and Experimenta 02. His current areas of interest include webcams, the landscape, and text in all forms. Knight’s writings have been published in Art Journal and Sandbox. He is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Visual and Media Arts at Emerson College, where he teaches classes in interactive media.

For more information about Turbulence please visit http://turbulence.org.

Jo-Anne Green, Co-Director
New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc.: http://new-radio.org
New York: 917.548.7780 . Boston: 617.522.3856
Turbulence: http://turbulence.org
New American Radio: http://somewhere.org
Networked_Performance Blog: http://turbulence.org/blog
Upgrade! Boston: http://turbulence.org/upgrade

Turbulence Commission: [meme.garden] by Mary Flanagan, Daniel Howe, Chris Egert, Junming Mei, and Kay Chang

http://turbulence.org/works/garden

[meme.garden] is an Internet service that blends software art and search tool to visualize participants’ interests in prevalent streams of information, encouraging browsing and interaction between users in real time, through time. Utilizing the WordNet lexical reference system from Princeton University, [meme.garden] introduces concepts of temporality, space, and empathy into a network-oriented search tool. Participants search for words which expand contextually through the use of a lexical database. English nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs are organized into floating synonym “seeds,” each representing one underlying lexical concept. When participants “plant” their interests, each becomes a tree that “grows” over time. Each organism’s leaves are linked to related streaming RSS feeds, and by interacting with their own and other participants’ trees, participants create a contextual timescape in which interests can be seen growing and changing within an environment that endures.

The [meme.garden] software was created by an eclectic team of artists and scientists: Mary Flanagan, Daniel Howe, Chris Egert, Junming Mei, and Kay Chang.

[meme.garden] is a 2005 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc., (aka Ether-Ore) for its Turbulence web site. It was made possible with funding from the Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Additional support from the PSC-CUNY research fund.

For more information about Turbulence please visit http://turbulence.org

Jo-Anne Green, Co-Director
New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc.: http://new-radio.org
New York: 917.548.7780 . Boston: 617.522.3856
Turbulence: http://turbulence.org
New American Radio: http://somewhere.org
Networked_Performance Blog: http://turbulence.org/blog
Upgrade! Boston: http://turbulence.org/upgrade

“Too Much Freedom?” Freewaves’ 10th Biennial Festival of Film, Video and Experimental New Media

Opens November 3 & 4 at the Hammer Museum
7:00 – 11:00 p.m. both days
Free admission
“Too Much Freedom” unleashes 100 videos in the Hammer Museum’s central courtyard with two phantasmagoric floors of simultaneous video projections. Cheeky and challenging, maddening and inspiring, come celebrate and explore artists’ interpretations of freedom, and ask yourself: too much. . . or too little?

The festival continues at www.freewaves.org with streaming video coming soon in November, plus FREE events:

* Video installation at Pomona College Museum of Art, Nov. 5 – Dec. 17 (reception Nov. 5, 5:00 – 7:00 p.m.), featuring two experimental, impressionistically styled works by Oliver Ressler: “The Fittest Survive” and “5 Factories: Worker Control in Venezuela.”

* Discussion, screening and reception at LACE, Sat. Nov. 11, 8:00 p.m. on artistic censorship at a time of questionable internet freedom and political paranoia. Includes local festival artists and curators, as well as the editor of “Censoring Culture: Contemporary Threats to Free Expression,” Robert Atkins.

* Screening and speak out at the National Center for the Preservation of Democracy, Sat. Nov. 18, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m., a collaboration with Media That Matters, showcasing short films on relevant contemporary topics by a group of next-generation film and videomakers.

Current festival information at www.freewaves.org/festivals.htm.
Freewaves
An online magnet for the media arts, Freewaves is a grassroots yet global arts organization connecting innovative, relevant, independent new media from around the world.

For more information contact Heidi Zeller at 323.871.1950 or heidi@freewaves.org

MUESTRA NET ART ::: DONDE Y DURANTE

DONDE Y DURANTE
http://www.2-red.net/dondeydurante/

(Reflexiones sobre tiempo, lugares y desplazamientos en una selección de 8
obras de web art)

Comisario: Juan Martín Prada

Artistas participantes: Vadim Bernard, Harris Skibell + Shaque, Joëlle
Bitton + Alexis Nema, Takuji Kogo; anonymes.net; Second Planet, La Société Anonyme; Armelle Aulestia.

Organiza: Área de las Artes. Ayuntamiento de Madrid.

Una muestra concebida para el Gabinete de Cultura Digital de la Noche en
Blanco de Madrid. Fue presentada en el Palacio de Comunicaciones el 23 de septiembre de 2006.

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WHERE AND DURING
http://www.2-red.net/dondeydurante/

Meditations about time, places and desplacements in a selection of 8 web art works.

Curator: Juan Martín Prada

Artists: Vadim Bernard, Harris Skibell + Shaque, Joëlle Bitton + Alexis Nema, Takuji Kogo; anonymes.net; Second Planet, La Société Anonyme; Armelle Aulestia.

Produced by Área de las Artes. Council of Madrid.

An e-show curated for the Cabinet of Digital Culture of the White Night Madrid (September 23rd 2006.)

“Fearings” Open Call

What is fear? Why should you be afraid? What, who is to fear? Where
does your fear come from?
Participate in creating a collective voice about “fear”. Help
revealing it’s actual tendencies.
http://bram.org/peur/fear/index.htm

Thank you for your attention.
Annie Abrahams

“FearingS” is a part of the project Oppera Internettikka – Protection
et SÈcuritÈ by Annie Abrahams & Igor Stromajer
http://www.intima.org/oppera/oips/

Project supported by The Ministry of Culture of the Republic of
Slovenia, The Ministry of Culture of the Republic of France, The
Municipality of Montpellier, The Council of the Languedoc-Roussillon
region and Rhizome.org 2006-2007 Commissions.
Co-produced by Intima Virtual Base (Slovenia), Panoplie.org & bram.org (France)

Turbulence Commission: “Nothing Happens – a performance in three acts” by Nurit Bar-Shai, Zachary Lieberman and Rich Miller

http://turbulence.org/works/nothingHappens/

“Nothing Happens” is a networked online performance in which the viewers work together to make a series of objects tip over. The performance consists of three acts, which are centered on staged environments – a high shelf, a cluttered tabletop, and a deserted corner. Each scene contains a central protagonist, respectively: a cardboard box, a clear pint glass full of water, and a wooden chair. In all three acts, web-enabled physical devices controlled by the viewer’s clicks will make these objects tip over.

The three acts will be presented on October 15th, 22nd and 29th at 3rd Ward gallery Brooklyn (http://www.3rdwardbrooklyn.org). Please join the artists for an opening reception Sunday, October 15, 2006 6-8 p.m.

“Nothing Happens – a performance in three acts” is a 2005 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc., (aka Ether-Ore) for its Turbulence web site. It was made possible with funding from The Greenwall Foundation. Additional support from 3rd Ward Gallery.

BIOGRAPHIES

NURIT BAR-SHAI’S main interest lies in exploring tensions between the mundane and the uncanny in everyday life. Emanating from her creative roots in fine arts, Bar-Shai employs video and new technologies to explore fundamental questions of presentation and representation, to reframe the familiar and turn audiences into foreigners in their own ontological domains.

ZACHARY LIEBERMAN’S work uses technology in a playful and enigmatic way to explore the nature of communication and the delicate boundary between the visible and the invisible. He creates performances, installations, and on-line works that investigate gestural input, augmentation of the body, and kinetic response.

RICH MILLER is a sculptor and a recent graduate of the Interactive Telecommunications Program at NYU. His creative energies are focused on making electro-mechanical pieces that humor him, as well as designing and fabricating innovative and dynamic children’s museum interactives and furniture. He lives and works in Astoria, NY.

For more information about Turbulence please visit http://turbulence.org.

Jo-Anne Green, Co-Director
New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc.: http://new-radio.org
New York: 917.548.7780 . Boston: 617.522.3856
Turbulence: http://turbulence.org
New American Radio: http://somewhere.org
Networked_Performance Blog: http://turbulence.org/blog
Upgrade! Boston: http://turbulence.org/upgrade

Second Natures: UCLA Department of Design | Media Arts

Faculty Exhibition for the opening of the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Center
Curated by Christiane Paul

http://projects.design.ucla.edu/exhibitions/SecondNatures/

Exhibition Dates:
September 14 – October 26, 2006
Opening Hours:
Tuesday through Saturday, 12 – 5 PM.
Thursday, 12 – 7 PM.
Closed on Sunday and Monday.
Admission Free

Eli and Edythe Broad Art Center
240 Charles E. Young Dr. North
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Public Reception:
Saturday, Sept. 30, 6 ˆ 9 PM

second natures, the UCLA Department of Design | Media Arts exhibition — curated by Christiane Paul, adjunct curator of new media arts at the Whitney Museum of American Art — features work by faculty members Rebecca Allen, Robert Israel, Rebeca Méndez, Vasa Mihich, Christian Moeller, C.E.B. Reas, Jennifer Steinkamp, and Victoria Vesna. The exhibition is on view in the first- and second-level spaces of the new Eli and Edythe Broad Art Center designed by Getty Center architect Richard Meier.

The works presented in the exhibition to varying degrees all reference the concept of a “second nature.” Some projects literally reflect on natural processes or depict landscapes or present a simulated nature. Others simulate natural processes in organic visual structures and use principles of artificial life and intelligence to create a programmed nature. Yet another body of works is based on principles of optics and shows how light and the eye mediate the perception of our environment.

In their different approaches and media, the works included in second natures construct a multi-faceted picture of the possible meanings and connotations of nature — a picture that is very much of its time and informed by the current cultural and political climate. Nature appears as processed, both in the sense of natural resources and the medium that represents it. It presents itself as designed, simulated, technologically connected and filtered through human perception, or as an imaginary space.

The exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated catalogue. Faculty teaching theory in the D | MA department, Erkki Huhtamo and Katherine Hayles, contributed essays to the catalogue.

Works in the exhibition:
Victoria Vesna
Water Bowls: moon ~ drop ~ sound ~ oil, 2006
In collaboration with: John Houck (Software Art), Tyler Adams (Sound), James Gimzewski (concept / science)

Casey Reas
Process 4 (Software 1), 2005.
Process 4 (Image 2), 2005.
Seoul B, 2004.

Rebecca Allen
Bush Soul #3, 1997 – 2000

Christian Moeller
Heaven, 2005

Robert Israel
Parsifal (staircase). Model for the stage design of Parsifal (Richard Wagner), Seattle Opera 2003.
The Voyage (Philip Glass), model for stage design, The Metropolitan Opera, NYC, 1992.
Oedipus, Model Proposed for Director Dialogue.
Greek Satyr Play, Model Proposed for Director Dialogue.
Parsifal (Richard Wagner), Photo of stage design.

Rebeca Mendez
Homeland, 2006
Homeland, Peace White
Homeland, Low Green
Homeland, Guarded Blue
Homeland, Elevated Yellow
Homeland, High Orange
Homeland, Severe Red

Jennifer Steinkamp
Dervish, 2004-05

Vasa Mihich
Sculpture #3108, 2005
Painting 182 N, 2003
Paintings 191 N, 194 N (2003); 207 N, 209 N, 217 N, 222 N, 223 N, 230 N, 241 N, 244 N, 251 N, 255 N (2004)

Turbulence Commission: “Self-Portrait” by Ethan Ham

http://transition.turbulence.org/works/self-portrait/

“Self-Portrait” is a software search for the artist’s face among the millions contained in the photos uploaded to www.flickr.com. The project’s site displays three photos: 1) an ever-changing photo that depicts what is currently being evaluated by “Self-Portrait’s” facial recognition software; 2) the most recent photo that was identified as containing a face. (The software often misses seeing faces and occasionally misidentifies an inanimate object as a face.); and 3) the most recent photo that has a high probability of depicting Ethan Ham (the artist). Clicking on this photo allows viewing earlier photos that were found to contain Ethan.

“Self-Portrait” is a 2006 commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc., (aka Ether-Ore) for its Turbulence web site. It was made possible with funding from the Jerome Foundation.

BIOGRAPHY

Ethan Ham is a kinetic and new media artist who has recently moved to New York from Portland, Oregon. His projects often involve art generated by viewer participation, seemingly random events, and/or automated means. He is Assistant Professor of New Media at City College of New York, CUNY.

For more information about Turbulence please visit http://turbulence.org

Jo-Anne Green, Co-Director
New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc.: http://new-radio.org
New York: 917.548.7780 . Boston: 617.522.3856
Turbulence: http://turbulence.org
New American Radio: http://somewhere.org
Networked_Performance Blog: http://turbulence.org/blog
Upgrade! Boston: http://turbulence.org/upgrade