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Category: Literature

Introducing ImagePlot Software: explore patterns in large image collections

Image: 883 Manga series from the scanlation site OneManga.com.
Total number of pages: 1,074,790

Lev Manovich and Jeremy Douglass, 2010.

——

ImagePlot is a free software tool that visualizes collections of images and video of any size. (The largest set we tried so was: 1,074,790 one megabyte images).

DOWNLOAD IMAGEPLOT 0.9

ImagePlot works on Mac, Windows, and Lunix.
Max visualization resolution: 2.5 GB (2,684,354,560 grayscale pixels, or 671,088,640 RGB pixels).

ImagePlot was developed by the Software Studies Initiative (softwarestudies.com) with support from the National Endowment for Humanities (NEH), the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), and the Center for Research in Computing and the Arts (CRCA).

Along with the program, we also distribute a number of articles by Lev Manovich, Jeremy Douglass and Tara Zepel that address methodologies for exploring large visual cultural data sets, and discuss our digital humanities projects which use ImagePlot. (The articles can be also downloaded directly from softwarestudies.com.)

Visualizations created with ImagePlot have been shown in science centers, art and design museums, and art galleries, including Graphic Design Museum (Breda, Netherlands), Gwangju Design Biennale (Korea), and The San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art.

ImagePlot software was developed as part of our Cultural Analytics research program.

Learn more about Imageplot at Software Studies.

MOBILE ART FEATURES #2


New Media Artist Peggy Nelson: Exploring the Parallax of Identity

Interviewed by Molly Hankwitz, Contributing editor, NewmediaFIX

Peggy Nelson is a Boston-based  new media artist, writer, and filmmaker, who has been exploring Twitter as a medium for literary interaction with audiences, and using various high- and low-tech tools to explore urban history and psychogeographic casts upon places. Nelson’s work is part of trends in art and writing to more fully engage public spaces through use of new technologies to probe and intervene in the surface layers of human memory, thought and interaction.

MH: Twitter literature, what is it and how is it collaborative?

PN: Twitter literature is published via Twitter, 140 characters at a time. Some authors are posting their already-written novels, one tweet at a time. Some are re-posting diary entries from real people, often long-dead. I am creating a narrative within Twitter as I go, and leaving it open for responses by other people who might ask the main character questions. In a sense, every Twitter account is a character, a “performance,” even if that performance is “me” or “you.” So when I create an account for a character, the character is actually telling their story, and I am not just pasting in sentences from a prewritten novel. I don’t co-write or crowdsource. I still believe in individual creation, and Twitter as a propagation medium, or platform. However, during my recent project, In Search of Adele H [https://twitter.com/adelehugo], people didn’t interact as much as they might have or I thought they would. They realized it was art, and kept a respectful distance. I was not encouraging them to step back. It just happened.

MH: You create the work through a Twitter account and individuals receive the tweets and can weave their own stories with the fiction subconsciously or even start a thread. How do they get to the work, or you to them? Through Twitter?

PN: Yes. The first piece was inspired by The Story of Adele H, by Francois Truffaut (1975). My ‘Adele H’ happened within Twitter. ‘She’ was a public account. Thus Adele H gained followers just like any other Twitter account and she followed people back. I had a supplemental blog for the project, where I explained the piece, and periodic articles in various journals, including OtherZine [http://www.othercinema.com/otherzine/index.php?issueid=22&article_id=89]. I also invited interested people by asking them to follow and participate. However, what happened was that almost no one intervened with their own replies or tried to change the narrative. Even though all these tools allow interactivity, we don’t always avail ourselves of it. We still like to kick back and “listen.” I think there is great value in being an audience for each other.

I called Adele H a Twitter “film,” following along the lines of Yoko Ono’s Instruction Pieces. The movie occurs in your mind as you read the tweets. Ono’s paintings were supposed to occur in your mind as you read the Instructions. I started with an outline for a “normal” art film that I had written about Adele Hugo, Victor Hugo’s youngest daughter, as my narrative structure. I intended to take a similar approach to Ross McElwee’s in Sherman’s March (1986), where he sets out to do a documentary about Sherman’s March and ends up telling the story of his own relationships and girlfriends. I intended to tell Adele’s real history woven through with my own relationship stories; to tell tragedy as comedy. But once I got on Twitter, it occurred to me that it would be more interesting to bring “Adele” back to life as a cyber-entity, and to have her tweet, in the present, from both her own century and ours. This would give the feminism more depth.

Her own writing was obsessive fantasies created with quill pen and diary; these fantasies became her life. Today many people journal very publically through blogs and Twitter, and while it’s not always clear exactly where reality leaves off and fantasy takes over, when it goes public, numerous differences emerge which can be very intriguing. First of all, audiences can read what is written immediately, or at least this is possible and it’s increasingly more difficult to secrete away thoughts in some attic endlessly embroidering them. Online, writers need to be self-aware. It’s substantially different from a diary. Also, readers and authors are both “in” Twitter, in the same narrative space as the characters, so there can be some wonderful overlaps. Thirdly, we are using this technology to reinvent ourselves and our characters. A parallax is provided, therefore, to what we are doing in the present, by using an older character, one from another time, to mediate.

MH: Are you working on other social media projects?

PN: I have begun a Twitter novel, Shackleton [https://twitter.com/EShackleton], about another real person, Ernest Shackleton, and his Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. Shackleton’s ship was crushed in the ice, and he spent two years trying to escape; they couldn’t get a message out because they had no radio system, and radios didn’t reach that far back then anyway. There were other mishaps while trying to survive and get the men back alive. Numerous films have been made and books published on this adventure; the 1999 exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History in New York rejuvenated Shackleton’s reputation and publicized the story. However, most of the books and films leave out significant events – there is too much to absorb.

Paradoxically, the micromoments of Twitter allow me to tell stories of substantial length, and to reveal all the close calls and death-defying escapes, without them all hitting at once, since you don’t have to stay with micromoments all the time. You don’t have to make a special interruption in your day, to enjoy them per se. They fit into minutes, bus rides, ordinary  activities. You get the tweets and in your mind you can start aggregating the larger story. But fragmentation is fine. You don’t have to get the whole story. You can miss some and get the rest of it later, you’re never locked into a strict chronological narrative.

Best of all, the medium is truly democratic. Anyone can make one of these Twitter projects. Twitter accounts are free. I’m influenced by graffiti, and public art of this kind; the idea of many messages all over the city; small interventions into urban spaces. Tweeted characters (like Adele H) are interventions into cyber-spaces. I use computers and communications technologies constantly, in my job as a designer. I am always thinking of how I can repurpose them for art.

MH: Do you think personal blogs perceived to be written by males are read differently, as something more like gaming, identity, news?

PN: We still have a gender differentiation in the culture about how we receive written material and male authors still tend to be taken more seriously, more quickly, even if what they’re writing is a series of extemporaneous personal reflections; while women still have to prove themselves, often over and over. Men can also be very critical of and aggressive toward each other’s writing, sure, but the fact is that there is still a gender gap in perception. We have a lot of work to do as feminists in this area.

MH: In this work on Shackleton you play a male character. Do you think audiences may choose to interact more with this narrative character?

PN: Good question. They might. Not only is Shackleton a male character, but the narrative is an action-adventure story, whereas Adele H was about unrequited love that took place in a woman’s head. I don’t know if readers will react more aggressively to such an alpha-male story, and try to post or interact with “him” more because of that, or if they will again keep a respectful distance because they see it as art. I don’t have a preference for a certain reaction, I’m fine with the distance, but if there’s more interaction, I’ll see how it goes. I’m not hiding the fact that I am a woman and I am writing Shackleton’s life, but will they see the character as male, or have an issue with a woman writing it?  I don’t know. I’m sure you have had the experience of having to identify with male characters in a story or film because that’s what was there. That feels familiar to many women. Men don’t tend to have the same problem.

MH: Talk about your outdoor public mobile projects, please.

PN: I am working on some distributed narratives in real space. The first one, The Audio Tour [http://theaudiotour.com], premiered at Burning Man in 2006. I recorded various sounds and impressions  from blogging my travels both on and off the playa. These were downloadable to any mp3 player, and I also had mp3 players to take or borrow at my camp. I was inspired by the Situationist concept of the dérive, which encouraged not conforming to main avenues and official urban spaces; finding your own version of a city or place, when coming up with the tour. I tried to do a dérive of the space of Burning Man, if you will, and then let others hear it.

The Audio Tour drew from museum audio guides, the kind where you are told to “play No. 3″ and an art historian tells you about the art — but with a twist. My audio was randomized. You play the entries at random with no “listening stations” marked as such. Thus, the listener decides what a listening station might be. You wander around with the downloads and arrive at a listening station — simply by deciding you are at one!  The recorded passages, juxtaposed with the place the listener is, tend to match up. We are pattern-making and pattern-seeking animals. Whenever we walk around, we are flowing along with our stream of consciousness. It might be about the place we are in, it might be about a conversation we need to have, it might be music, some ideas from a book, or concerns about public affairs. Our experience of a place is not only determined by the place but all that we bring to it, vertically, historically, and especially when traveling. I wanted that kind of “mash-up” to comprise the content of the tour. The basic idea is: stream of consciousness out in the world.

The second project was Web021 [http://www.web021.org/]. “021” is the beginning of the Boston zip code. Web021 was somewhat similar to The Audio Tour, but not as random. It was about real Boston history plus quotes and passages of fiction set in Boston. It used 2D barcodes (or QR codes) on stickers. You see them more often in magazines now, advertising various things, but you can make your own. I designed my own 2D barcodes on stickers and put them up all over Cambridge, MA, where I live; each one was linked to a unique URL that would give you one of these passages, from Hawthorne, or Santayana, or Samuel Adams, about Boston. It was location-specific in that the stickers were intentionally put at particular places and the text was centered around both real and fictional “Bostons.” Of course, the piece was in Boston. I was very influenced by graffiti and all the stickers we see drawn on with Sharpies. I guess it is locative art. I think of it like Smithson’s Spiral Jetty, as art in the environment, except not all in one spot; Web021 was distributed; deliberately made not to be seen all at once. Twitter is also a distributed medium, more in time than space. The audiences doesn’t need to read it all at once and the distributed fragments can add up to something much larger, deeper and more substantial.

MH: Your pieces differ on the grounds of their interactivity, and what’s interactive changes from contexts of the computer at home to an augmented reality context/QR code application. Do you feel a greater familiarity with Twitter and social media and, perhaps, continued exposure to these mobile literary art forms in your audience, will lead to their participation in your future works?  Will you design for this?

PN: That’s a good question. I have not been as concerned with interactivity being a central component of my work up to this point. I have included it as a possibility in some of my pieces, especially the Twitter work, but it’s optional, and does not “break” the piece if it doesn’t happen. What I’d really love to see is other people becoming inspired to do their own locative art, either in real space or in cyberspace, so we can have many artistic and cultural interventions like these, similar to how we have lots of graffiti by different makers. In many urban environments graffiti is the norm, not the exception. I’d love to see narrative and sonic interventions achieve a graffiti-like saturation.

MH: Thank you.

Peggy Nelson, New Media and Film – artist’s website

http://peggynelson.com/

Netprov comes alive again in a few hours!

The second Live Show of Grace,Wit&Charm, tonight May 24, 7:00pm Central Time (GMT -5) at Teatro Zuccone

and webstreamed at http://gracewitandcharm.com click on “STREAM LIVE”

Continue reading »

Dead Fingers Talk: The Tape Experiments of William S. Burroughs

28th May – 18th July 2010

www.imagemusictext.com

Listen to your present time tapes and you will begin to see who you are and what you are doing here mix yesterday in with today and hear tomorrow your future rising out of old recordings

everybody splice himself in with everybody else

Continue reading »

FEATURE: Searching for a New(er) Digital Literature”, Curated by Alan Bigelow

“Searching for a New(er) Digital Literature” is an exhibition of twelve multimedia works that offer readers representative examples of new digital poetry and fiction on the web. Curated by Alan Bigelow, it includes work by Jim Andrews, Marvin Bell & Ernesto Lavandera, Sommer Browning & Mark Lomond & Johanne Ste-Marie, Andy Campbell, J.R. Carpenter, Chris Joseph & Kate Pullinger, Tammy McGovern, Stuart Moulthrop, Alexander Mouton, Jason Nelson, Victoria Welby, and Jody Zellen.

The exhibit is both online and offline. The offline exhibit launched on January 15th at Austin Peay State University in Tennessee, USA. The online exhibit is available at http://www.terminalapsu.org

Terminal, the online venue, is a space sponsored by the Department of Art and the Center for the Creative Arts at Austin Peay State University to showcase and examine Internet and new media art. The site is directed and maintained by Barry Jones, Associate Professor of Art at Austin Peay State University.”

FEATURE: The Golden Notebook Project, by the Intitute for the Future of the Book

On November 10th, The Institute for the Future of the Book kicks off an experiment in close reading. The seven women listed below will read Doris Lessing’s The Golden Notebook and carry on a conversation in the margins. The seven readers will also record their reactions to the process in a group blog. There is also a public forum in which everyone who is reading along and following the conversation can post their comments on the book and the process itself.

Note: This is not essentially an experiment in online reading itself. Although the online version of the text is quite readable, for now, we believe books made of paper still have a substantial advantage over the screen for sustained reading of a linear narrative. So you may also want to suggest to your readers that they order copies of the book now. Whichever edition of the book someone reads (US, UK or online), there is a navigation bar at the top of the online page will help locate them within the conversation.

Source of the text above as well as more information about the project and the book: http://www.thegoldennotebook.org/

Electronic Literature Collection, Vol. 2 — Call for Work

The Electronic Literature Organization seeks submissions for the Electronic Literature Collection, volume 2. We invite the submission of literary works that take advantage of the capabilities and contexts provided by the computer. Works will be accepted from June 1 to September 30, 2008. Up to three works per author will be considered; previously published works will be considered.

The Electronic Literature Collection is a biannual publication of current and older electronic literature in a form suitable for individual, public library, and classroom use. Volume 1, presently available both online (http://collection.eliterature.org) and as a packaged, cross-platform CD-ROM, has been used in dozens of courses at universities in the United States and internationally, and has been widely reviewed in the United States and Europe. It is also available as a CD-ROM insert with N. Katherine Hayles’ full-length study, Electronic Literature: New Horizons for the Literary (University of Notre Dame Press, 2008).

Volume 2, comprising approximately 50 works, will likewise be available online, and as a cross-platform DVD in a case appropriate for library processing, marking, and distribution. The contents of the Collection are offered under a Creative Commons license so that libraries and educational institutions will be allowed to duplicate and install works and individuals will be free to share the disc with others.

The editorial collective for the second volume of the Electronic Literature Collection, to be published in 2009, is Laura Borràs Castanyer, Talan Memmott, Rita Raley and Brian Kim Stefans. This collective will review the submitted work and select pieces for the Collection.

Literary quality will be the chief criterion for selection of works. Other aspects considered will include innovative use of electronic techniques, quality and navigability of interface, and adequate representation of the diverse forms of electronic literature in the collection as a whole. For volume 2, we are considering works of electronic literature in video.

Works submitted should function on both Macintosh OS X (10.5) and Windows Vista. Works should function without requiring users to purchase or install additional software. Submissions may require software that is typically pre-installed on contemporary computers, such as a web browser, and are allowed to use the current versions of the most common plugins.

To have a work considered, all the authors of the work must agree that if their work is published in the Collection, they will license it under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License, which will permit others to copy and freely redistribute the work, provided the work is attributed to its authors, that it is redistributed non-commercially, and that it is not used in the creation of derivative works. No other limitation is made regarding the author’s use of any work submitted or accepted.

To submit a work, prepare a plain text file with the following information:

* The title of the work.
* The names and email addresses of all authors and contributors of the work.
* The URL where you are going to make your .zip file available for us to download. The editorial collective will not publish the address of this file.
* A short description of the work — less than 200 words in length.
* Any instructions required to operate the work.
* The date the work was first distributed or published, or “unpublished” if it has not yet been made available to the public.

Prepare a .zip archive including the work in its entirety. Include the text file at the top level of this archive, and name it “submisson.txt”.

Upload the .zip file to a web server so that it is available at the specified location. Place all of the text in the “submisson.txt” file in the body of an email and send it to elc2.elo@gmail.com with the name of the piece being submitted included in the subject line.

The Electronic Literature Collection is supported by institutional partners including: Brown University, Literary Arts Program; Center for Program in Contemporary Writing at the University of Pennsylvania; Duke University, Program in Literature; Hermeneia at the Open University of Catalonia; Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies; nt2; Pomona College, Media Studies Program;UCSB, Department of English; University of Bergen, Department of Literary, Linguistic, and Aesthetic Studies, Program in Digital Culture; University of Dundee, School of Humanities.

Institutional sponsorship opportunities are still available. If your organization or academic department is interested in more information, please contact Helen DeVinney, Managing Director of the ELO, at hdevinney@gmail.com.

Mark Marino,
ELO. Director of Communication
http://eliterature.org

UbuWeb Podcast #4: The Tellus Cassettes

UbuWeb Podcast #4: The Tellus cassettes

Listen / Download here::
http://www.poetryfoundation.org/
audio/BestDecadeEver.mp3

Produced by The Poetry Foundation, UbuWeb is pleased to announce the latest in its podcast series, focusing on Ubu’s hidden treasures. This podcast gives a guided tour of UbuWeb’s collection of the Tellus Cassette Magazines comprising nearly 1,000 MP3 files recorded between 1983 and 1993. This podcast features narrated selections from the series including Louise Lawler, Jerome Rothenberg, Gregory Whitehead, Glenn Branca, Harry Partch and Paul Bowles

INTERVIEW: Mark Amerika, by Rick Silva


Image source: Realtime on Screen

This text is republished in collaboration with Rhizome.org. It was released in Rhizome Digest on 11/21/07 and appears here as it was originally posted.

+ [Rhizome] Editor’s Note: Rhizome originally planned a Summer of Books editorial project that would deliver a handful of reviews and interviews to your inbox, over the Summer of 2007. It turns out that people would rather play on the beach than review books in the warmer months, and the project evaporated like a summer dream. But this interview between new media artists Rick Silva (ricksilva.net) and Mark Amerika (markamerika.com) still cried out for publication.

Rick Silva: Where are you right now?

Mar Amerika: I’m in Falmouth, near Land’s End, Cornwall, UK. It’s the perfect location for my second feature-length “foreign film” as part of my Foreign Film Series. The first one, “My Autoerotic Muse” was shot in New York City on Central Park West. Muse was made with HDV technology, was seeded at Sundance two years ago, and is in the final stages of postproduction. This new one, “Immobilite,” is being shot entirely on mobile phone and is being seeded by the Tate Modern and the iRES research group at the University College Falmouth. Once you get on some of these country roads in Cornwall and start driving by these dramatic cliffs overlooking the vast sea, you realize why some say it feels like the absolute end of the Earth.

RS: Your new book META/DATA is a collection of your writings on the web over the last 15 years, why in book form and why now?

MA: Well, it’s only partly my web writings. META/DATA is a mix of writing that includes spontaneous artist theory, short fictions, scholarly investigations, and dialogues with other artists that I’ve been improvising over the last 15 years. Some of it has been previously published online, but a lot of it has also appeared in print. There are also collage-styled experimental essays pieced together from various keynote presentations and seminars I’ve delivered over the years.

One of the things I discussed with Joel Slayton who was then editor of the Leonardo Book Series, and Doug Sery at MIT Press, is that I felt like there was a lot of writing out there that was valuable for its techno-theoretical context and did a pretty good job of reporting on the emerging new media scene and the effects new media technology is having on the culture at large, but that it might also be valuable to publish a collection of writing by an artist who, while having a background in net art, is also a published novelist and experimental essayist, someone who could blur the difference between fiction, memoir, theory, conceptual art document, and scholarly writing. MIT has a reputation for publishing these kinds of collections with artists who come from other scenes like Carolee Schneeman, Robert Smithson, Vito Acconci, Martha Rosler, Mike Kelley, etc. Fortunately, they read my prospectus and early excerpts, and agreed to publish it. So I have been piecing together this!
book for the last few years. Because I’ve been moving around a lot and activating my “digital art personas” in many parts of the network art culture, the book is finding a diverse audience. For example, right now, the European VJ and live A/V scene seems to be attracted to it. I just heard from a colleague who will include it in their graduate course on World Literature. And of course, the net art world is likely to find it useful too.

RS: How does writing influence your artmaking and vice versa?

MA: Writing is where it all begins. Writing, for me, is like hacking into virtual space and shaping the world I live in. It can even be prophetic, as Burroughs says. Not in the sense of writing down “I will win the Lotto tomorrow” and then it happens (although that’s cool too — drinks are on me!). Rather, by intuitively tapping into the creative unconscious, one can oftentimes reveal an image of themselves in the world that they may have never visualized before. I can do this by writing. Others draw, or paint, or play sax.

Look at my character in GRAMMATRON, Abe Golam. GTRON turned ten years old this June. I wrote it as a multimedia hypertext in 1993-1997. The story of GTRON takes place way in the future and is partly about a cyborg-narrator (Golam) who was once part of a net art scene that collectively hacked itself into the mainstream art world and changed art history. But this was 1993, before anyone really had a clue that that would actually happen six or seven years later (I’m still waiting for the film “2000: The Year Net Art Broke”). Abe Golam, it ends up, was the first net artist, albeit a fictionalized version of one that precedes what we now know of as the early history of net art.

Of course, in my current Foreign Film Series, writing is still at the core of my project as the narrative is driven by the subtitles which reveal the disappearing persona (protagonist) who hovers over the scene. For example, in the first film, “My Autoerotic Muse,” this invisible protagonist obsesses over the web cam performance of a very well-to-do European writer who lives on Central Park West and uses her web cam performance as source material for her research. This is all revealed in the subtitles, even though we spend long moments throughout the film looking at her web cam image ourselves.

RS: You also have a background in filmmaking, could you talk about your use of (moving and still) image and text?

MA: As an undergraduate, I studied with Alain Robbe-Grillet, a major figure in the French Nouveau Roman literary movement and who also was then securing his reputation as an experimental filmmaker. He wrote very erotic books, was the principal collaborator on Resnais’ Last Year at Marienbad, touched off a wave of artist-generated theory, and his own films, like Glissements Progressifs du Plaisir, were very influential on my impressionable mind back then. At 19, I decided that I would leave the University of Florida, where I was studying creative writing and literature at the time, and move to L.A. to study film at UCLA so that I too could make my erotic art films. Very naive, yes? But I learned a lot while at UCLA and made some life-long friends including Nile Southern who has helped me direct the cinematography on the Muse film. It took me 25 years, but now I am making my foreign art films, although not as movies per se, rather, I see them as unique works of moving visual a!
rt that are adapting to the changes taking place in network culture. Most people who will be reading this interview know exactly what I am talking about, that is, what is the difference between cinema, digital narrative, net art, video art, VJing, and mobile blogging? Recognizing the differences while simultaneosuly blurring them into a hybridized art practice that I call “postproduction art” is where a lot of contemporary art and writing is shifting to these days. I have been working in all of these areas for the last 25 years and yes, there’s a difference in technology and even methodology between the genres and formats, but going back to your previous question, I am able to shift between these media and mediums quite fluidly because at root, I approach them as a writer, a hacker, a semiotic codeworker.

RS: Will Abe Golam be running for president in 2008?

MA: I have been consulting with him. I did a lot of his speechwriting and took on the press secretary duties for the 2004 election and found it gratifying work. I believed in his candidacy, thought he was the right avatar for the job, and felt deeply connected to the mission which was to oust the current administration and implant a virtual government. He’s in a position now where I think he can patiently wait and take his time deciding if he thinks his entry into the race would be best for the country. He could easily come in later, after all of the other announced candidates have essentially tired themselves out. He is well-positioned to take advantage of the netroots political environment to spread his memes and generate huge Facebook, Myspace, flash-mob, and meet-up support. It would be great if he did. But I also know that he’s enjoying his life outside of mainstream politics and may not want all of the attention that an active campaign would bring. That’s all I can say!
right now.

ELO and Library of Congress to archive 300 works of E-Lit

The United States Library of Congress is archiving 300 electronic literature web sites in collaboration with the ELO (Electronic Literature Organization) and archive-it.org. To participate in this project, please see

http://eliterature.org/wiki

(and note there is a FAQ linked on that page,

http://eliterature.org/wiki/index.php/FAQ)

If you have further questions, please use the contact page at the main ELO URL,

For more information on the archive itself, please contact ELO Director Joseph Tabbi (jtabbi@gmail.com) or Patria Tomaszek (tomaszek@fk615.uni-siegen.de).

*****************
Categories:

*************
Electronic Literature: Collections of Works: Sites that aggregate works of electronic literature by multiple authors, such as online journals and anthologies.

Electronic Literature: Individual Works: Individual works of electronic literature and collections of works by a single author, as opposed to collections of works by multiple authors.

Electronic Literature: Context: Sites related to the critical, theoretical, and institutional contexts of electronic literature.

*******************************
Criteria for submission
**************************

This style guide is meant to provide general guidelines for drafting archive-it description entries.

Contributions should be submitted directly on: http://eliterature.org/wiki/

All contributions should include the title of the work and the URL where it resides. All contributions should name the entity that is primarily responsible for making the work (name of Editor, Author or other Creators). Please name the language that is used and the publisher (the entity that makes the work available; i.e. name of a person, organization or a service).

Additionally, you should provide a brief and substantial (1-3 sentence) description of the work, following these guidelines:

* You might want to identify the site’s purpose, its content, its creators and its aesthetic.
* You should focus on the work itself and its mode of presentation (not the awards won or the influence exerted by the author or institution).
* Evaluative statements and self-evaluations ought to be avoided.
* Avoid stating quotes (i.e. comments on a work) or reproductions of reviews and blurbs written for promotional purpose.
* Information on technique, software and programming should not precede or obscure descriptions of what a work is about.
* Important dates like the foundation of the site or journal should be added in the description. Provide information on how often a journal is published and what it is focusing on.
* Please include ISSN numbers in your description.

Mark Marino
Electronic Literature Organization
http://eliterature.org